Announcing the 2016 Alexia Grant Winners

March 29, 2014. A group of boys climb a tree on the Xingu River by the city of Altamira, Brazil. One third of the city will be permanently flooded by the nearby Belo Monte Dam. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim

March 29, 2014. A group of boys climb a tree on the Xingu River by the city of Altamira, Brazil. One third of the city will be permanently flooded by the nearby Belo Monte Dam. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim

The Alexia Foundation is pleased to announce the winners of the 2016 Alexia Grants. The winner of the $20,000 Professional Grant is Aaron Vincent Elkaim of Toronto, Canada. The winner of the First Place Student Grant is Nathaniel Brunt of Toronto, Canada.

Aaron Vincent Elkaim was awarded the Professional Grant for Where the River Runs Through, which examines the consequences of Brazil’s major hydroelectric expansion on the ecosystems, communities, and industries within the Amazon Rainforest.

Elkaim was in Brazil when he learned of the prize. Up to this point, Elkaim has self-funded his project. He was concerned that this trip might be his last, but with the funding provided by The Alexia Grant, he will continue to be able to give this important topic the attention it needs. As part of his Alexia prize, Elkaim will have an exhibition at the 2016 Look3 Festival.

“I am especially pleased with Aaron Vincent Elkaim’s project, as I have long wanted to get involved in water and its effect on our environment,” said Aphrodite Tsairis, Alexia Foundation co-founder. “Brazil’s hydroelectric expansion and its relation to the Amazon rainforest puts Alexia in a key position to weigh in on this environmental issue.”

COLOMBIA - NOVEMBER 2007: Judith and Isa, two female FARC guerrillas from the bloque movil Arturo Ruiz, inside one of the FARC camps. The Bloque Movil Arturo Ruiz of the revolutionary armed forces of Colombia (FARC) are a special unit of FARC who fight in many different regions of Colombia. This unit is like a quick reaction force who help other sub-groups of FARC. About 35% of the Colombian Territory is under the strict control of the Revolutionary Forces of Colombia, or the FARC, as the self-declared Marxist-Leninist guerrilla is known in this country, where they have operated since 1964. As a result of the total lack of infrastructures and presence of the state in these regions, the civil population living in these territories has nearly no alternatives. Poverty, the cultivation of coca leaves or the incorporation to the armed group present at the area are the only choices left. The cultivation of coca leaves is the only choice actually left to farmers, if they wish to survive and support their families. The armed groups that operate in the area guarantee the purchase of the entire harvest. Photo by Alvaro Ybarra Zavala/Getty Images Reportage

COLOMBIA – NOVEMBER 2007: Judith and Isa, two female FARC guerrillas from the bloque movil Arturo Ruiz, inside one of the FARC camps. The Bloque Movil Arturo Ruiz of the revolutionary armed forces of Colombia (FARC) are a special unit of FARC who fight in many different regions of Colombia. This unit is like a quick reaction force who help other sub-groups of FARC. About 35% of the Colombian Territory is under the strict control of the Revolutionary Forces of Colombia, or the FARC, as the self-declared Marxist-Leninist guerrilla is known in this country, where they have operated since 1964. As a result of the total lack of infrastructures and presence of the state in these regions, the civil population living in these territories has nearly no alternatives. Poverty, the cultivation of coca leaves or the incorporation to the armed group present at the area are the only choices left. The cultivation of coca leaves is the only choice actually left to farmers, if they wish to survive and support their families. The armed groups that operate in the area guarantee the purchase of the entire harvest. Photo by Alvaro Ybarra Zavala/Getty Images Reportage

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala received a Judges Special Recognition award for Colombia, The Parallel State, which documents the reality of a civilian population who live in a hidden Colombia that only knows the reality of sixty years of war.

Finalists for the Professional Grant were Adriane Ohanesian for The Last Lives, Rebel Darfur, Brendan Hoffman for Brotherland: War in Ukraine, Krisanne Johnson for Post Apartheid Youth, and Asa Sjöström for Moldova Silent Land.

Men gather for a procession in Sopore after the release of separatist leader Syed Ali Shah Geelani  who had spent 236 days under house arrest. (Fall 2013) Photo by Nathaniel Brunt

Men gather for a procession in Sopore after the release of separatist leader Syed Ali Shah Geelani who had spent 236 days under house arrest. (Fall 2013) Photo by Nathaniel Brunt

First Place Student Winner Nathaniel Brunt was awarded the Alexia Grant for #Shaheed, a study of the war in Kashmir, the men fighting in it, and the changing relationship between technology and the representation of conflict. Brunt is in his final year of a master’s degree at Ryerson University in Toronto. He will use the prize of a semester at Syracuse University to further his goal of earning a PhD and to produce his project into a book.

“Overall, the student proposals were of the highest caliber, in many instances far surpassing those of the pros,” said Aphrodite Tsairis. “This speaks to the fact that Alexia is teaching a whole new generation of photo storytellers how to write a good proposal.”

Genaro closes the dentist office after a long and hard day's work. Photo by José Márquez

Genaro closes the dentist office after a long and hard day’s work. Photo by José Márquez

Student Award of Excellence Grants were awarded to José Márquez of Brooks Institute for Próspero, which tells the story of a man who believed in the American Dream and ran for his life across the border from Mexico to the United States to follow his dreams; to Gabriela Arp of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for Traces, a 360-video virtual reality experience that explores the memories—both real and imagined—of Willie E. White, an 88-year old woman living with dementia;

Willie E. White, 88, poses for a portrait at her daughter's home in Durham, North Carolina. Ten years ago, Willie was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and has been steadily losing her memory and the ability to perform tasks like making breakfast, taking a shower, and brushing her teeth. Photo by Gabriela Arp

Willie E. White, 88, poses for a portrait at her daughter’s home in Durham, North Carolina. Ten years ago, Willie was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and has been steadily losing her memory and the ability to perform tasks like making breakfast, taking a shower, and brushing her teeth. Photo by Gabriela Arp

to Sarah Blesener of The International Center of Photography for Chavi, which focuses on a surrogate family of fourteen-year old friends living in the projects in the southern Bronx, exploring issues of boyhood, adolescence, and belonging; and to Nick Wagner of Western Kentucky University whose A Migrant’s Mission looks at how one Mexican migrant worker has coped with leaving behind his family for nine months each of the last 13 years.

Edwin Amaro stands on top of a railing at the entrance of a project building in the southern Bronx, with friends Cole Jeffers and Chavi Leon, 27 Feb 2016, New York. Photo by Sarah Blesener

Edwin Amaro stands on top of a railing at the entrance of a project building in the southern Bronx, with friends Cole Jeffers and Chavi Leon, 27 Feb 2016, New York. Photo by Sarah Blesener

Judging took place April 1 and 2 at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. The judges for the 2016 competition were Teru Kuwayama, Darcy Padilla and Ami Vitale. All three are highly accomplished visual journalists and past Alexia Professional Grant recipients. The judging was moderated by Alexia Chair Mike Davis, who noted that this year’s submissions were the strongest to date.

The Alexia Foundation exists to give photojournalists the financial ability to give voice to those who go unheard, foster understanding and expose social injustice. The Alexia Foundation was created in 1991 in remembrance and celebration of Alexia Tsairis who was one of 35 Syracuse University students murdered in the terrorist bombing of PanAm Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland when returning home from their study abroad program in London.

B&H Photo and Think Tank Photo also provided support for the 2016 Alexia Grants.

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2 thoughts on “Announcing the 2016 Alexia Grant Winners

  1. I would like to thanks the ALEXIA foundation for their relentless efforts in providing fund for us in the profession . its give me a lot of courage to continue my career as photojournalist. I hope to win a project proposal one day