Exhibition: Alexia at 25 at LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph

NOVEMBER 26, 2014. Members of the Munduruku indigenous tribe walk on a sandbar on the Tapajos River as they prepare for a protest against plans to construct a series of hydroelectric dams on their river in in Para State, Brazil. The tribe members used the rocks to write 'Tapajos Livre' (Free Tapajos) in a large message in the sand in an action in coordination with Greenpeace. The Munduruku live traditionally along the river and depend on fishing and the river system for their livelihood. Although the tribe has over 10,000 members and has lived on the river for many generations, their traditional lands are unrecognized by the government giving them little legal protection against development, but have vowed to fight against the dams. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim

NOVEMBER 26, 2014. Members of the Munduruku indigenous tribe walk on a sandbar on the Tapajos River as they prepare for a protest against plans to construct a series of hydroelectric dams on their river in in Para State, Brazil. The tribe members used the rocks to write ‘Tapajos Livre’ (Free Tapajos) in a large message in the sand in an action in coordination with Greenpeace. The Munduruku live traditionally along the river and depend on fishing and the river system for their livelihood. Although the tribe has over 10,000 members and has lived on the river for many generations, their traditional lands are unrecognized by the government giving them little legal protection against development, but have vowed to fight against the dams. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim

The Alexia Foundation is pleased announce that it will be presenting the exhibition Alexia at 25 at LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph. Open from June 13-June 19 in downtown Charlottesville at the Pop Up Gallery (next to Bank of America) 306 East Main Street, the exhibit will celebrate Alexia’s quarter century of supporting stories that drive change.

“It is a first for LOOK3 to give space to a foundation that gives grants to photographers,” said Alexia Founder Aphrodite Tsairis. “We were able to convince them that our work as partners with and funders for actively working visual journalists is germane to today’s evolving photography world.”

That we are able to create a shared experience through the exhibition is like the third effect that happens between two images: The pairing elevates both experiences

Alexia at 25 will honor The Alexia Foundation’s 25 year legacy of supporting documentary photojournalism worldwide and celebrate the years to come. On display will be Where the River Runs Through by Aaron Vincent Elkaim, 2016 Recipient of the Alexia Grant, and Missing in Action: Homeless Women Veterans by Mary F. Calvert, recipient of the 2014 Alexia Women’s Initiative Grant.

Where the River Runs Through documents and strives to understand the consequences of the Belo Monte Dam Complex, Brazil’s major hydroelectric expansion on the ecosystems, communities and industries within the Amazon Rainforest. Nearing completion, the Belo Monte Dam is the third largest dam in the world. It is displacing over 20,000 people.

The project examines the impacts of the loss of construction employment for local and migrant workers, the growth of collateral industries such as mining, logging, ranching, and agriculture, and most importantly the stories of those who are being robbed of their birthright, the natural world that surrounds them.

Missing in Action: Homeless Women Veterans looks at those who served our country bravely, only to find themselves without a safe place to call home. Women veterans are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population in the United States and are four times more likely to become homeless than civilian women. For many women, the military was a way to escape a difficult situation, yet lack of advancement and high levels of harassment and sexual assault have driven them out.

Women who have survived Military Sexual Trauma are the most hidden population of homeless women and often flounder in unsafe relationships, live in their cars or endure drug-infested motels to avoid shelters or the street. These women have been failed by an impotent Department of Veteran’s Affairs, which is ill equipped to meet the needs of women, particularly mothers.

The project has been awarded a First Prize from World Press Photo for Long-Term Projects and the Cliff Edom New America Award.

Alexia at 25 is curated by Mike Davis, Syracuse University’s Alexia Tsairis Chair of Documentary Photography.

“The Alexia and LOOK3 share many common values and goals, so that we are able to create a shared experience through the exhibition is like the third effect that happens between two images: The pairing elevates both experiences,” explains Mike Davis.

An internationally recognized venue for photographic excellence, LOOK3 celebrates the vision of extraordinary photographers, ignites conversations about critical issues and fosters the next generation of artists. Festival goers have the opportunity to see and hear from an international roster of ten featured artists, participate in enhanced educational programs, visit world-class exhibitions, attend outdoor projections, and engage in free photography-related community events.

The Alexia Foundation is thrilled to be able to contribute to and help support this powerful gathering of photography.

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