National Geographic Publishes Elkaim’s Alexia Project

Aaron Vincent Elkaim was The Alexia 2016 professional recipient for Where The River Runs Through, a project that documents the consequences of Brazil’s major hydroelectric expansion in the Amazon Rainforest. That work has now been published as part of a major article by National Geographic.

“The idea is to show myth and imagination that exists within it,” Elkaim explains to the magazine. By making these people and this place visible to the wider world, Elkaim helps us all understand what will be lost when this complex is finished. Continue reading

Alexia’s James Dooley on Radio New Zealand

Alexia Foundation Executive Administrator James Dooley was featured on this past weekend’s Radio New Zealand’s Sunday Morning program, along with journalist, critic and scholar Alison Stieven-Taylor. They were on the show to discuss photojournalism in the smartphone age. Both were in New Zealand as part of the Auckland Festival of Photography.

We are grateful to Radio New Zealand for giving us the opportunity to discuss how important photojournalism is and thankful to our executive administrator for doing it so eloquently. Listen to the full interview in the post. Continue reading

Santiago’s “Stolen Lives, Stolen Future” in NYTimes, Scientific American and Instagram

Michael Santiago’s 2015 First Place Student Winning Stolen Lives, Stolen Future has been featured by both The New York Times and Scientific American. The project documents the experience of Black farmers in the U.S. His work tells of the pride of but also the decline of the African-American farmer, much of which was driven first by unjust traditions, such as sharecropping, and later by racially discriminatory loan practices, particularly by the USDA.

Santiago is taking over the Alexia Instagram feed this week with images from the project. Continue reading

Matt Black’s “Geography of Poverty” featured in MSNBC

Matt Black’s photos from the second part of MSNBC’s Geography of Poverty depict the correlation between poverty, environmental pollution, and illness. In the article “Cancer Alley: Big Industry, Big Problems,” Black’s black and white images are bold and haunting as they depict the tolls of systemic racism and the effects of proximity to toxic dangers such as petrochemical processing plants.
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Md Shahnewaz’s ‘Fallen Stars’ featured in The Quiet American

Md Shahnewaz Khan’s photo essay “Fallen Stars” which captures the plight of child labor in Bangladesh was published in The Quiet American. In 2015, Shahnewaz won an Alexia Award of Excellence for his project “Fallen Stars.” Continue reading

Family. Life. Project Opens; Featured on LENS Blog

The project Family. Life. from Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications has been unveiled and featured on the New York Times’ LENS blog. Directed by Andrea Wise as her graduate project and advised by Alexia Tsairis Chair for Documentary Photography … Continue reading