This is What a Photograph Can Do

Bunia, August 2003. 3 youths ranging from a boy to adolescent to young man all bear arms in the same Lendu militia unit on the road between Bunia and Marabou where killings occurred regularly. Roger LeMoyne/Alexia Foundation

Damien Roussat visited the U.N. Headquarters in New York as a young man in 2006 when The Alexia Foundation had its exhibition Eyes on the World on display. Last month, Roussat reached out to us. One of the photographs there had shaken his worldview and changed the course of his life. This is the power of the photograph. This is why we believe in and support photography that drives change. Continue reading

Marcus Bleasdale Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal

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Marcus Bleasdale wins the prestigious Robert Capa Gold Medal by the Overseas Press Club of America for his work on turmoil in the Central African Republic. Bleasdale, the 2005 Alexia Professional grantee, produced the award-winning work for Human Rights Watch, Foreign Policy and National Geographic. Continue reading

Interview with Marcus Bleasdale on Photography, Advocacy and Passion

62 year old Madalene shows sores that are all over her body as a result of drinking the water from the wells near the pipeline. Bacteria from the forest now runs into all of the well water in the area making it dangerous to drink. Yet the closest alternative well is 8 km away and many are forced to use the polluted sources resulting in sickness. The consortium has been aware of this situation for 4 years and has done nothing. In this town 75% of the residents now suffer from waterborne illnesses. Marcus Bleasdale/Alexia Foundation

Marcus Bleasdale received the 2005 Alexia Foundation Professional Grant for his project, “The Rape of a Nation: Oil Exploitation in Central Africa.” The work examined the construction of a new oil pipeline and its adverse effects on those it passed … Continue reading

“Gold, Guns and Germs: The Effects of Conflict in the DR Congo” by Roger LeMoyne

Boys under 18 years of age are separated from adult fighters at the Mushaki Congolese National Army military camp on March 22, 2005.  The young boys will go to a child soldier demobilization program run by UNICEF in Goma. Roger LeMoyne/Alexia Foundation

Roger LeMoyne’s 2004 professional project, “Gold, Guns and Germs: The Effects of Conflict in the DR Congo” looks at the impact of conflict on the civilian population of the region. Particularly, the work focuses on the children who have been … Continue reading

“Congo’s Silent Scream” by Melanie Blanding

Maria, 22, of Kindu, Maniema, undergoes surgery to repair a fistula at DOCS (Doctors on Call for Service) HEAL Africa clinic in Goma, North Kivu. A fistula is a tear in the vaginal tissue, leaving the patient incontinent. Urine and feces leaks from a woman’s body like a toilet that never stops flushing. The smell is pervasive and women often leave messes left on furniture. Many women are abandoned by their families and avoid social situations that may expose them. Often, the physical damage is so severe that women require three to six surgeries to fully recover. They must wait three months between each surgery. Melanie Blanding/Alexia Foundation

As we enter the final month of the 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant call for entries, we are going to use our photos of the day to highlight the tremendous work that has been done by Alexia Grantees in the past … Continue reading

Marcus Bleasdale Photos Help Compel Intel to Stop Using Conflict Minerals

62 year old Madalene shows sores that are all over her body as a result of drinking the water from the wells near the pipeline. Bacteria from the forest now runs into all of the well water in the area making it dangerous to drink. Yet the closest alternative well is 8 km away and many are forced to use the polluted sources resulting in sickness. The consortium has been aware of this situation for 4 years and has done nothing. In this town 75% of the residents now suffer from waterborne illnesses. Marcus Bleasdale/Alexia Foundation

Marcus Bleasdale, the 2005 Alexia Professional Grantee, has shown the world that photography truly can drive change. Intel, the world’s largest manufacturer of semiconductor chips, has vowed to use only ethically sourced minerals in their microprocessors. Microprocessors are present in … Continue reading

The Alexia Foundation on Violence Against Women

Tradition, Women's Rights and Circumcision in Guinea Bissau

Violence against women takes many forms which can be seen in a number of the projects The Alexia Foundation has supported for 23 years. One type of violence is overwhelming violence, the violence that is wholly gender based and clear … Continue reading

The Rape of a Nation by Marcus Bleasdale

The murky dirty spring water is used by most villagers along the pipeline. Many here are sick as a result of drinking the water from the wells near the pipeline. Bacteria from the forest now runs into all the well water in the area making it dangerous to drink. Yet the closest alternative well is 8 km away and many are forced to use the polluted sources resulting in sickness. The consortium has been aware of this situation for 4 years and has done nothing. In this town 75% of the residents now suffer from waterborne illnesses. Marcus Bleasdale/Alexia Foundation

Today’s photo is from VII photographer Marcus Bleasdale’s 2005 winning professional project, “The Rape of a Nation” which documents the terrible impact of oil exploitation on Central Africa. Marcus applied for the Alexia grant at the same time that funding … Continue reading

“Eyes on the World” Exhibition Preview Slideshow

Ramon Jimenez Cuen

On June 20 at 6 p.m., the “Eyes on the World” exhibition hosted by The Alexia Foundation opens at 25CPW Gallery in New York. On display will be some of the the most moving, provocative, and inspiring photographs from the … Continue reading

Marcus Bleasdale on Oil Exploitation in Central Africa

Fishermen in Kribi who have given up fishing now "Fish Sand" for building. Fish stocks dropped to almost nothing after the pipeline was laid. There has been virtually no compensation for the thousands of fishermen whose livelihood depends on fish stocks. More than half of the fishermen have abandoned their pirogues. Those who stay can no longer afford to school their children or feed them regularly. The pipeline carries 225,000 barrels of oil a day and benefits to the US consortium over will be $8bn. Human Rights abuses and health problems all caused by the pipeline are common place. Marcus Bleasdale/Alexia Foundation

Today’s photo is from Marcus Bleasdale’s 2005 professional project, “The Rape of a Nation: Oil Exploitation in Central Africa“. When Marcus proposed the project, oil exploitation was already wreaking havoc on the central African nations of Cameroon, Chad, the Congo, … Continue reading