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War/Conflict
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North America
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9/11, Sept. 11, New York, USA, Patriotism, Terrorism
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For some thirty years most Americans lived their lives at a peaceful distance from an advancing string of attacks in places like Beirut, Lockerbie, Kenya and Yemen but for many, September 11th was a direct hit which awakened an intense blend of fear, pride, anger, patriotism and sorrow. The sites of the attacks, particularly the World Trade Center site, became the focus of pilgrimage for those seeking to understand, to grieve communally, or simply to see history with their own eyes.
Logan Wallace

1999 — student award of excellence

For some thirty years most Americans lived their lives at a peaceful distance from an advancing string of attacks in places like Beirut, Lockerbie, Kenya and Yemen. For many, however, September 11th was a direct hit and awakened an intense blend of fear, pride, anger, patriotism and sorrow. The sites of the attacks, particularly the World Trade Center site, became the focus of pilgrimage for those seeking to understand, to grieve communally, or simply to see history with their own eyes.

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The ordinary becomes ominous in the days following the September 11th terrorist attacks on New York and Washington.

For some thirty years most Americans lived their lives at a peaceful distance from an advancing string of attacks in places like Beirut, Lockerbie, Kenya and Yemen. For many, however, September 11th was a direct hit and awakened an intense blend of fear, pride, anger, patriotism and sorrow. The sites of the attacks, particularly the World Trade Center site, became the focus of pilgrimage for those seeking to understand, to grieve communally, or simply to see history with their own eyes. Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation
Fresh off a flight from California, Nicole Thomas, a Christian missionary, crumbled at first site of the World Trade Center remains. She and fellow missionaries quickly began working the crowd, handing out small cards that featured a cross, and American flag, the Statue of Liberty and Psalm 46, "God is our refuge and our strength, an ever-present help in trouble." Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation
A southern view of the World Trade Center site, as life goes in in lower Manhattan. Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation
On his fourth visit to the World Trade Center site, Fuat Kozluklu breaks down as he surveys the rubble. The Turkish-American journalist is a former war correspondent who lives and works in Washington, D.C. "I know what the pain means," he said, because of the suffering he saw while covering Bosnia, Macedonia and Pakistan. "The people who did this are worse than cavemen, worse than barbarians." Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation
The weary gaze of firemen follows tourists as they browse the gallery at Here is New York; a collection of amateur and professional photographs related to the September 11th attacks. The collection began with a single photograph posted in a shop window and grew to thousands of images; becoming a tourist attraction just as the World Trade site has. Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation
On a windy day, two women in lower Manhattan cover their mouths to filter the smoke and ash drifting from the fires that still burned in the rubble of the World Trade Center. Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation
One year after the attacks, World Trade Center snow globes are only one of dozens of September 11th-related souvenirs being sold in the area around the World Trade Center site in lower Manhattan. Vendors also hawk binders of photographs, books, t-shirts and hats. Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation
With the patience and expertise of a professional tour guide, construction worker Jody Dupuis explains to a group of visitors from Missouri exactly how the World Trade Center buildings had stood and how they fell on September 11th. Dupuis works for Tully, one of the first contractors to be called in to work on the site last September. He said he watches thousands of people visit the site every day. "To the workers it's just work," he said, "but the tourists, sometimes I forget that these people haven't seen it yet. Being down here every day you can lose sight of what's going on around you." Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation
Japanese paper cranes, a symbol of peace, number in the thousands in areas of New York that have become shrines and memorials of the September 11th terrorist attacks. Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation
Jonathan and Valerie Mercado of Queens match their hands to handprints on a banner sent to New York City as a gift of support from elementary school students in Hershey, Pennsylvania. The students' art teacher delivered the 54'x7' banner himself, hiking around lower Manhattan for five hours before he found a suitable place to hang it. Logan Wallace/Alexia Foundation