“Gold, Guns and Germs: The Effects of Conflict in the DR Congo” by Roger LeMoyne

Boys under 18 years of age are separated from adult fighters at the Mushaki Congolese National Army military camp on March 22, 2005.  The young boys will go to a child soldier demobilization program run by UNICEF in Goma. Roger LeMoyne/Alexia Foundation

Boys under 18 years of age are separated from adult fighters at the Mushaki Congolese National Army military camp on March 22, 2005. The young boys will go to a child soldier demobilization program run by UNICEF in Goma. Roger LeMoyne/Alexia Foundation

Roger LeMoyne’s 2004 professional project, “Gold, Guns and Germs: The Effects of Conflict in the DR Congo” looks at the impact of conflict on the civilian population of the region. Particularly, the work focuses on the children who have been affected by this lengthy and brutal war.

The theme of war’s civilian victims seemed to be thrust upon me as I traveled to areas of conflict

“I did not set out to cover conflicts in this light. The theme of war’s civilian victims seemed to be thrust upon me as I traveled to areas of conflict,” says Roger. “The fate of civilians was inescapable and drew the camera to it, while the geography and hardware of conflict seemed less real than the suffering it left behind, particularly among the young.”

Roger’s work looks at the role of child soldiers in the war in the DR as well as the children working the mines abandoned by multinational corporations. Disruption of services and infrastructure also impacts civilians in that hospitals are left without staff, supplies or medicine. The death of a young child of malaria shows us the reality of these circumstances moving us all to care about this conflict.

The Alexia Foundation supports our grantees to produce stories and images that drive change. See previous photos of the day here. You can read an interview we did with Roger about his work here.

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